Beauty and beyond

Zooming in on Ladakh, Isaac Titan Gergen’s ongoing exhibition makes a case for deeper engagement with the land and its culture

“After the Elusive Light: Photographing Ladakh” is series of photos, shooting several components of Ladakh and its way of life, accumulated over a span of 5 years by means of Isaac Titan German.

The man in the back of the lens dabbles in some of other arts, painting, sculpting, and pottery to call some. Isaac explains, “I use pictures to bridge the space between my philosophy and my artwork.” For example, operating on a painting may be a long drawn out manner, throughout which a variety of pictures takes place. It is in these moments of transitions that images serve as a medium of reflection for him.

Through his work, Isaac brings a kaleidoscopic Ladakh to us. One unique photo of a midsummer subject is an explosion of colors, highlighting the abundance of shade and splendor that summer season brings to the place. From the terrace of the Ladakh Arts and Media Organization (LAMO) center, in which Isaac holds the office of the Arts Officer, he has captured the snow protected rooftops of a town bustling with exchange and pastime. As winter arrives in its entire force, human beings are pressured to stay indoors, however, even in that point of inaction, lifestyles nevertheless flourishes with the same pressure.Seasonal adjustments dramatically adjust ‘the land of excessive passes’, and the comparison is amplified whilst the plush inexperienced and colorful summer season landscape is placed next to the pristine white and bare iciness landscape.

The scenic splendor of Ladakh isn’t always the handiest focus of Isaac’s camera. Apart from the breathtaking landscape of Ladakh, the exhibition also includes graphics of its human beings and insights into its wealthy culture. Buddhism plays a distinguished role in the cultural background of the region. The situation of one of the portraits is an One or an astrologer who’s consulted by means of the Buddhist Ladakhis for advice and steerage. History and traditions are passed on to the more youthful generations orally, verbally and in practice. Isaac’s digicam takes us to the festivities of Losar (a Tibetan competition) in which generations come together to revel in the celebrations.The Dard network of Ladakh, according to Isaac, are perhaps the maximum photogenic of Ladakhis and as an affidavit to this declaration, hangs at the left nook of the gallery a monochrome photograph of a Dardic beauty. Interestingly, the network has Greek roots which have trickled right down to the existing day traditions of the Dardic humans.

The exhibition is a lesson in Ladakhi heritage and is one of the many contributions that Isaac had made for the renovation of the equal. A native of Ladakh, Isaac left his place of birth to pursue his studies when he was in excessive faculty, however, Ladakh had constantly been in his mind and in his excursion plans. As both an intruder and an insider, the photographer has seen Ladakh trade time beyond regulation. One of the most difficult elements hindering any attempt to consolidate Ladakhi art is that it frequently gets subsumed under the larger umbrella of Tibetan artwork. But Isaac believes that there has been a gradual progress in carving out a gap for Ladakhi art as an independent artwork form and, at the same time as contributing to the same, he hopes to discover his own vicinity within the network that he has again to after being removed from it for goodbye. He believes, “Preservation should be realized without denying development… It is all about taking the network with you.”